Posts Tagged ‘John Ward’

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As I mentioned the other day Buy Amoxicillin Without Prescription, , any of you that have regularly read Gate 21 have probably notice the deafening sound of the silence here for the past month or so.  That silence was prelude to this post.  There is no better way to say it than to quote the words of the legendary John Ward:

It’s Time…





I started Gate 21 in 2007 not really knowing what I was getting myself into.  I really had no concept of what it was that I wanted to do with the site or, in fact, how I would do it.  I just decided one day that I could write a blog as well as the next guy and within 10 minutes, the original version of Gate 21 was live for all to see over at WordPress.com.  Within 2 months, I had over 10,000 visitors and had taken the site to a privately hosted (i.e. I had to pay for it) server and debuted the cartoonish looking site that hung around until mid-2009 when I overhauled the site once again.  You are looking at that version now.


Since that less-than-auspicious beginning in 2007 I have spent literally thousands of hours writing, online Amoxicillin without a prescription, Where to buy Amoxicillin, designing, re-vamping, buy Amoxicillin without prescription, Buy Amoxicillin without a prescription, updating, and otherwise working on producing and publishing Gate 21.  Along the way I have had had the help of many, Amoxicillin brand name, Amoxicillin schedule, many, people.  These would include writers HomeSweetHome and VolAmbassador, order Amoxicillin from mexican pharmacy, Amoxicillin recreational, who have both made major contributions to the site over the past several years.  Then there were others across the blogosphere who have both assisted and collaborated with me on articles, memes, online buying Amoxicillin, Buy Amoxicillin online cod, roundtables, Power Polls, Amoxicillin gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release, Purchase Amoxicillin online, BlogPolls, and running jokes.  These would include folks like Ghost of Neyland, Amoxicillin used for, Rx free Amoxicillin, MoonDog, LSUFreek, discount Amoxicillin, Amoxicillin no prescription, Will, Hooper, ordering Amoxicillin online, Buy Amoxicillin online no prescription, and of course—the best of the best—Joel at Rocky Top Talk.  These are but a few of the many with whom I have interacted and with which I have had the pleasure to become acquainted.


Then there are those of you out there across the blogosphere and the wider arc of the internet that have visited my humble site and read a bit of what I had to say.  There are even those of you who have taken the time to leave a comment here and there.  To each and every one of you I offer my sincerest gratitude for more than 2 years of interaction across the divide that is the internet.  I have not always been right about things, I have not always been serious, buy Amoxicillin online cod, Amoxicillin use,   I have not always been couth, Amoxicillin steet value, Buying Amoxicillin online over the counter, but I have always tried to be honest about my views and perspectives on the world around me and my love for the Tennessee Volunteers.  All I can say is that these last 2 1/2 years have truly been a pleasure.


All things, however, Amoxicillin schedule, Herbal Amoxicillin, must come to an end…


Thus, while it pains me on many levels, discount Amoxicillin, Where can i buy cheapest Amoxicillin online, this will likely be the last post on Gate 21, at least for the foreseeable future.  And, Amoxicillin blogs, Order Amoxicillin online c.o.d, now it is time for the Gate to close.


The thousands of hours that I have spent on this site have been a labor of love, as blogging always is.  While I may have advertisements here on the Gate, purchase Amoxicillin for sale, Where can i order Amoxicillin without prescription, the fact of the matter is that I have lost money on this endeavour from the outset.  The cost of hosting the site alone has been substantial.  Yet, this exploration of “Life, buy Amoxicillin without a prescription, Amoxicillin price, coupon, the Universe, and the Bounce of the Ball” (Thank you Douglas Adams) has been a welcome and wonderful creative outlet for me, about Amoxicillin, Amoxicillin reviews, and one which has been far more “therapeutic” than I ever imagined.  And to those of you who have visited and taken the time to comment all I will say is that you never know just how much a single sentence left in the comment box or via Twitter really means to folks like myself who are blogging their lives away.


There’s really nothing that makes a writer feel better than knowing what they wrote was interesting enough that someone felt compelled to respond…


Now, however, Amoxicillin pictures, Amoxicillin treatment, the demands of my “real” life are such that I simply cannot maintain the Gate in the way that I have in the past.  It is hard enough to run a site with substantial help and a bevy of free time.  It is next to impossible to do that alone while trying to maintain a job, a family, canada, mexico, india, Buy Amoxicillin from mexico, and some semblance of sanity.  As I have said before, the informational cycle on the blogosphere lasts approximately as long as the attention span of a hyperactive 4-year-old who just ate 5 bags of Skittles and washed them down with three cans of Red Bull, and I simply cannot keep up with that.  My lack of timely comment over the past football season stands as a testament to that reality and one which I simply can no longer ignore.

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="I know, Frank, shocking isn't it?"][/caption]

These sorts of conclusions are not always fun, but they are necessary.  I think Lieutenant Frank Drebin probably said it best:

A Spoonful of Drano sound bite

Okay, enough of the depressing stuff, now for the good news…


For those of you who have enjoyed my writing—though I am certain there aren’t that many of you—take heart!  I am not abandoning my devotion to Tennessee athletics only to go gentle into that good night.  While I may not be able to justify continuing on here at the Gate, I fully intend to continue writing about the Vols.  Why?  Because, in the words of Clay Travis, I simply cannot imagine not doing it.


VolNation Thus, it is my distinct pleasure and honor to announce that, effective immediately, I will be joining on as a writer for the VolNation Blog.  Thus, any of you who wish continue to read my mindless prattling, I’ll still be around.  I cannot overstate how lucky I feel at having the chance to jump on board at VolNation, and I hope to see some of you over there in the near future.  While my time at Gate 21 is now at an end, I am extremely excited about what the future holds in store for me at VolNation.


In the meantime, the Gate will not be disappearing (though, after the next few days, I really won’t be monitoring comments any longer).  It will still be here and you will still be able to send me hate mail via the contact form here on the site, at the email address listed in the sidebar and on the Ushers page, or via Twitter.  For those of you who have subscribed to the RSS feed here at the Gate, you can now follow me via the feed at the VolNation Blog.  The Gate will now take its place among the so-called “dotsam and netsam” that floats across the web.  Everything will stay right where it is—most notably, my tribute to Sam and Andy’s.


As for me, I am on to a new home on the web and new challenges.


So, for the last time, I bid you farewell from Gate 21.  To each of you out there with whom I’ve come in contact as a result of my time publishing Gate 21 over the past 2 1/2 years, I say thank you for reading, best wishes, and Godspeed.  Now, more than ever, I suppose my signature “tagline seems appropriate.  Thus, I will end this final post as I have ended those that came before it.


Until we meet again … Go Vols!

-- So it goes …Email lawvol No McAlisters

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Modalert For Sale

Tennessee Football Modalert For Sale, Regardless of how things turn out for the Tennessee Volunteers this fall, the 2009 season represents so very many milestones—it really isn’t even worth the trouble to try and count them all.  There has been so much change lately and so very many new looks and faces that everything seems as if it is in flux.  Some feel this near c-change is long overdue, others decry it as a loss of tradition, others still reserve judgments and simply point to the inevitable movement of the hands of time.  Still, no matter how great the changes may be, the echoes of years gone by still ring in the air around Neyland Stadium.  Thankfully, this will never change.

Vol Network In addition to all of the “obvious” landmark events that have or will occur as part of the 2009 football season, Purchase Modalert online, there is one more that may go unnoticed by many.  Though it hardly seems possible, the 2009 season marks Bob Kesling’s tenth year as the “Voice of the Vols.” Since the kickoff of the 1999 football opener against the Wyoming Cowboys, Kesling along with color-commentator Tim Priest, Modalert schedule, and sideline reporter Mike Stowell (who succeeded Jeff Francis in 2007), Purchase Modalert online no prescription, have brought the sounds of Big Orange football into our homes via the “Statewide Stadium” that is the Vol Network.

As have I pointed out in previous posts, since I was a child, Modalert without a prescription, I have always been a dedicated fan of live sports radio broadcasts.  I learned at an early age that television broadcasters, Order Modalert from United States pharmacy, no matter how good they may be, simply cannot match the style, flair, doses Modalert work, color, Modalert wiki, or excitement that a gifted radio sportscaster can bring to a game.  There are few on television that come close—Ron Franklin and Mike Gottfried being pretty much the best—but even they cannot quite stay in step with the great radio broadcasters of the game.  Of course, for every Franklin and Gottfried, there are a bevy of lackluster talking suits which do little more than get in the way of the game rather than actually improving your understanding of what is taking place, generic Modalert.

Thus is the curse of television…


It is one thing to verbally recount what viewers just saw on their screen; it is an entirely different thing to narrate—paint a word picture—that which listeners depend on the broadcaster to pluck from the ether and make real.  It is remarkably easy to be sloppy and boring when broadcasting a game on television—the images speak for themselves.  With radio, Modalert class, however, the broadcaster creates those images and the world in which they exist.

That is why I will always be a fan of radio play-by-play broadcasters…

Thus, cheap Modalert, for the past ten years, Modalert long term, we in Orange Nation have depended upon Bob Kesling to paint those pictures and to create those images—he has been the one to guide us through every play of every game.  On the whole, I have to say that Kesling has done a good job.  While I will be the first to admit that Kesling’s early broadcasts seemed to me a bit “sterile” and deadpan, over the past decade he and his gameday cohorts have steadily improved and I think they do a fine job of broadcasting Tennessee Football.  Suffice it to say that I listen each week, Modalert natural, even if the game is on television or even if I am in Section Y7 watching it for myself.

This decennial milestone, however, is less about the ten years that Kesling has served as the chief broadcaster for Tennessee, and more about the man he replaced.  I still can hardly believe that it has been ten years since last we heard the inviting and familiar baritone sounds of John Ward as the “Voice of the Vols.

Though Bob Kesling does a fine job, I still miss John Ward.

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="148" caption="John Ward & Lowell Blanchard"]John and Lowell[/caption]

John Ward served as the Voice of the Vols in some capacity from 1963 until 1998, starting out as the host of the Tennessee coaches shows and as the PA announcer in Neyland Stadium.  Ward first began Vols play-by-play announcing when he began broadcasting Tennessee basketball games, along with the late Lowell Blanchard, in 1965.  Then, in 1968 veteran Vol Network broadcasters George Mooney (who started the Vol Navy) and Bob Fox decided to pursue other endeavors, paving the way for Ward and color-commentator Bill Anderson to assume their position behind the microphone, Modalert For Sale. Modalert description, I first heard Ward when he broadcast the now legendary 1985-86 Sugar Bowl—where an underdog Tennessee Volunteers squad bested the No. 2 Miami Hurricanes by 28 points.  That game was, and remains, about Modalert, one of the most significant Tennessee football games of all time.  Ward, Buy Modalert without a prescription, however, made it even better.  After hearing just one broadcast by John Ward it is fair to say that I was hooked.

After that first experience, where to buy Modalert, I could be found crowded around a radio whenever the Big Orange took the field.  I longed to hear John Ward and Bill Anderson relay the plays to me and the thousands of others out there in their own distinctive style.  To this day, Modalert blogs, I am a religious believer that if I am watching Tennessee play on TV, the sound goes off and the radio turns on.  However, in the era before satellite radio and internet webcasts, Modalert overnight, tuning in the Vol Network from my hometown of Asheville, Is Modalert safe, North Carolina was not always an easy proposition.  There was no Vol Network affiliate serving my area.  Still, I found that if I was lucky, and if the game was at night (when the ionosphere makes radio signals carry farther) I could pick up the scratchy signal of the broadcast emanating from a station near Murphy, buy Modalert without prescription, North Carolina.  Though my mother thought I was crazy constantly trying to tweak the radio to get just a bit more clarity, Modalert maximum dosage, I always tried to find the broadcast.  She also thought I was about half-cracked when, as a student at Tennessee, I figured out a way to mount a tiny radio inside my marching band hat while I was in the Pride of the Southland, Modalert treatment, thus enabling me to listen while in the stands.  John Ward made it worth my while. Modalert for sale, [caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="450" caption="John Ward & Bill Anderson host the "Kickoff Call-in Show" in 1997"]ward_hands[/caption]

To this day, I am still a dedicated Vol Network listener and always have my earphones with me when sitting in Neyland Stadium. Modalert For Sale, From 1986 to 1998, I listened to as many broadcasts as possible.  I learned a lot about the game of football, about Tennessee, and about communicating an image.  I learned that often I could see the game better with my eyes closed and my ears open.  John Ward’s words became my eyes, and they never saw things as clearly as they did when he was painting the picture word by word.  I learned that Tennessee football was as much John Ward as John Ward was Tennessee football.  I learned that a true professional needs no introduction, no pomp, and no showy entrance.  I learned that class is a commodity not often found among broadcasters.  I learned that mistakes in public are not a bad thing if you can have a good laugh about it.

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="220" caption="Cartoon of Ward from 1998"]number1[/caption]

Both prior to his retirement at the end of the 1998-99 basketball season and since that time, Where can i buy cheapest Modalert online, I have been fortunate enough to have the opportunity to speak with John Ward on several occasions, and found him to be every bit as genuine and every bit the gentleman he was on the radio.  For me he truly was—and remains—the voice of Tennessee.  He told us the story and let it unfold across the airwaves.  He not only told us what was happening, but he managed to make it real, buying Modalert online over the counter, to make the excitement palpable. Modalert canada, mexico, india, Now, it has been ten years since he last sat behind the microphone in the communications center which bears his name inside the pressbox of Neyland Stadium.  Though this is difficult for me to imagine, I am sure there are many Tennessee fans today who have never heard Ward’s broadcasts and some who may not even know who he is.  On some level, buy Modalert online no prescription, that is very sad for me.  Yet, Where can i find Modalert online, traditions are made over time, and each generation has a hand in forming and re-forming those traditions.  They are not static.  For me as a child and a young man, John Ward was a tradition.  Over the past ten years, Modalert without prescription, however, Buy Modalert from mexico, Bob Kesling, Tim Priest, Bert Bertelkamp, Modalert from canada, and  Mike Stowell have started a new tradition for the Vol Network, Online Modalert without a prescription, one which I am sure in years to come will be remembered just as fondly as I remember Ward’s.

Still, as we prepare for the 2009 football season, herbal Modalert, on the cusp of a great undiscovered country, Modalert results, the hopes of the future, it seems only appropriate that we look back ten years and remember the man who came into our ears, into our homes, Modalert used for, into our lives to bring us the story of Tennessee.  That past is prologue for the future to which we all look.

In recognition of this little reminiscent look back, I have put together a little soundboard of a few of John Ward’s memorable calls and catchphrases.  I plan on finding a permanent home for this soundboard here at the Gate, but for now, here are “21 Things” from the John Ward Era that still make me smile, Modalert For Sale. Modalert forum,

Rest assured, Where can i cheapest Modalert online, I’ll be listening this fall from my perch in the North Endzone, from my home in North Carolina, or wherever else I might find myself on a gameday.  That is the primary reason why I own an XM Satellite Radio.  Yes, Modalert pictures, I still listen to the Vol Network every chance I get.

So here’s to all the folks at the Vol Network for giving me and countless other Vol fans across the globe a reason to tune in.  Thank you for giving that experience to all of us who wear the orange.  Thank you for building and maintaining that wonderful tradition

…and a special thanks to the man who started that tradition for me: John Ward.

-- So it goes …Email lawvol No McAlisters




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Here's a little magic from John Ward and the Vol Network to go along with Joel's post over at Rocky Top Talk this morning discussing Shaun Ellis' miraculous runback of a recovered fumble versus the Auburn Tigers in 1998.


Abilify For Sale, I would try to describe it, but that would only diminish the call from the legendary "Voice of the Vols Emeritus."  But don't take my word for it, listen for yourself...


[audio:/ellis.mp3]


How can you not love the sound of John Ward behind the microphone?


-- So it goes Email lawvol No McAlisters



**Disclaimer and Notice: All Audio Clips remain the property of the licensing authority and their respective universities and/or institutions. Gate 21 makes no claim of ownership to these clips, Abilify schedule, Australia, uk, us, usa, and they are displayed on this website for the sole purpose of public commentary, discussion, online buying Abilify, Abilify long term, and discourse, and are, fast shipping Abilify, Abilify maximum dosage, in good faith, believed to be a Fair Use, Abilify duration. Buying Abilify online over the counter, Any questions or concerns regarding the display of such audio should be directed to the publisher of this site.
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A Legendary Run Ends… Munson Retires

Obviously, I am a fan of the Tennessee Volunteers.  First and foremost, however, I am a lover of all of the great and grand traditions of college football, of the sport that creates such passion, and of the magical memories it makes for so many regardless of the colors they may wear.

It is for that reason that today is a sad day.  Last night legendary (and there is no word that fits other than “legendary”) college football radio announcer Larry Munson announced his retirement effective immediately.  Munson, who will celebrate his 86th birthday on Sunday, has served as the radio voice of the Georgia Bulldogs for 43 wonderful years.

Due to failing health, Munson began only announcing Georgia home games in 2007.  Then in April of this year Munson was diagnosed with blood clots in his brain and underwent brain surgery.  Some wondered if he would return for football season this fall.  Undeterred, Munson announced Georgia’s the home opener versus Georgia Southern.  Last night, however, Munson decided that it was time.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="500" caption="Larry Munson: Voice of the Dawgs for 43 years"]Larry Munson: Voice of the Dawgs for 43 years[/caption]

As I wrote in February, I remember all too well, what it felt like to hear John Ward announce his final game as the Voice of the Vols.  I was heartbroken to know that his voice would no longer announce “It’s Football Time in Tennessee!”  I still miss hearing him broadcast the fortunes of the Vols across the radio.  With no disrespect to Bob Kesling and Tim Priest—who do a fine job—it simply is not the same without Ward behind the microphone.  Still, at least the Vol-faithful had a year to honor Ward and color-man Bill Anderson, and one last chance to enjoy their wonderful brand of football announcing.  For the Georgia fans, it is already over.

I sincerely want to send out my personal best wishes to Larry Munson as he enters retirement.  Still, it simply won’t be the same.  There are so few of the grand college announcers  such as Ward and Munson left, and soon they will all fade from the airwaves and into memory.

Good luck, and Godspeed, Larry Munson!  You may be gone, but you will never be forgotten…

-- Go Figure …Email lawvol


Image Courtesy of: AJC.com / Curtis Compton

Flashback: The Great Games — The All-Time Top 10

Flashback | Gate 21

Well, as Joel pointed out, the News Sentinel’s Dave Hooker recently came out with his Top 10 games in Tennessee football history. It is an interesting list, but (like Joel) I’m not so certain I agree with all of the games on Hooker's list.

Given the fact that I am still making my way through my "Great Games" series, it seems appropriate for me to chime in with my thoughts on this. At the risk of rendering some of my future posts in this series futile (not that they aren’t already), here is my top 10 games in Tennessee football history (with comparison to Dave Hooker’s ranking):


The Great Games | Gate21.net

Gate 21’s Top 10 All-Time

FB-00-Tennessee[1]

Tennessee Football Games


No. 10: 1989 - Tennessee vs. UCLA

The Rose Bowl | Dave Hooker Rank: Unranked

I know that some will question this one, but this game still stands out to me as one of the best. I toyed with ranking the 1985 Auburn win at No. 10, but I have to go with the Vols 1989 trip to Pasadena to take on the Bruins. This game was early in the season, and at that point UCLA was highly touted. Tennessee had been beaten in both their prior trips to the Rose Bowl to play the Bruins (1975 and 1967), and many thought they would repeat that trend as the Vols came off of their worst season in recent memory, and a close call in their season-opener versus Colorado State. The Vols, however, stepped-up to the challenge and proved that their 5 and 6 record for 1988 was only a bump in the road as they came out gunning for the No. 6-ranked Bruins. The Vols completely shutdown the UCLA offense with their own brand of SEC defense, en route to a 24 - 6 victory. That game set the stage for the rest of the season -- one which included 10 more wins and only a single loss. The Vols would go on to win an SEC Championship, beat Arkansas in the Cotton Bowl that year, and end with a No 5 ranking.

Still, by my mind, it all started in California...


No. 9: 1999 Fiesta Bowl - Florida State vs. Tennessee

Sun Devil Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: No. 1

Dave Hooker had this game as No. 1, but I cannot in good conscience give it that distinction. While the 1999 Fiesta Bowl did give Tennessee its first Consensus National Championship since 1951, the game itself was not nearly as spectacular as others that season.

First of all, both Tennessee and Florida State played very sloppily throughout the game as a result of the more than 4-week layoff leading up to the contest. Second -- in fairness to Florida State -- they were playing with a back-up quarterback, Marcus Outzen, who (to my knowledge) never started another game after the championship, due to the injury to Chris Weinke.

Finally, the game was exciting, but probably only if you were a Tennessee or Florida State fan. The reason for this is that the two teams were extremely closely matched at most positions. All of that said, I have such amazing memories of this game and of finally seeing another championship for the Big Orange, that I have to include it in the Top 10, regardless of its flaws.

After all, a championship is a very special thing...


No. 8: 1939 - Alabama vs. Tennessee

Shields-Watkins Field | Dave Hooker Rank: Unranked

Obviously, I did not attend or watch this game. Still, the legendary status of this game lingers even today -- as does pretty much everything about the 1939 squad. I know this is hard to imagine in the modern era, but the 1939 squad not only went undefeated, but they also completed the entire regular season without being scored upon. Think about it this way, from the third game of the 1938 season until the conclusion of the 1939 season, Tennessee played 71 consecutive quarters without allowing a single point -- a record which stands to this day. The 1939 game against Alabama was but one of the legendary battles of this era between, then, Col. Robert Neyland’s (he would be promoted to the rank of Brigadier General during World War II) Vols and the Crimson Tide. In the minds of some, however, this is the game that truly cemented the rivalry and led to the designation "The Third Saturday in October."

Led by Johnny Butler and George Cafego, Neyland’s Vols managed to out-run, out-block, and out-wit the Tide in a 21-0 victory. The "feather in the cap" for the day came on Johnny Butler’s 56-yard run to the endzone in the 2nd-quarter. This was the last Tennessee-Alabama game that Neyland would coach until his return from military service in 1947.

Johnny Butler's Run

Click to view a RealMedia clip of Johnny Butler’s Run versus Alabama Courtesy of the VIB
An Oldie, but a Goodie...

No. 8: 1992 - Florida vs. Tennessee

Neyland Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: Unranked

For all the reasons I described in my post on this game, I really feel this was an extremely important game in the history of the program. Ignoring all of the side issues surrounding this contest -- the Faxgate affair, Johnny Majors' heart problems, the deluge of water that fell during the game, etc., I really feel this was a watershed game (no pun intended). First of all, it was the first of real battles between Tennessee and Florida during the Steve Spurrier era. Second, it was the first conference home game ever coached by Phillip Fulmer.

By my mind, this is the game that ushered Tennessee football into the modern era, and set the stage for all of the excitement during the 1990’s.


No. 7: 1996 Comp USA Citrus Bowl - Tennessee vs. Ohio State

Citrus Bowl Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: Unranked

Some might think this game an odd choice, but as I made clear in my article on this game, it really was one of the best games for Tennessee in the history of the program. Tennessee and Ohio State both came in ranked 4th (albeit in different polls) and both were disappointed that they did not manage to make it to a top-tier bowl. Both teams had a chip on their shoulder as they battled throughout a rain-soaked game. Tennessee held Heisman Trophy winner Eddie George to a season low, and fought to the end to win the day. This win, propelled Tennessee to a No. 3 final ranking -- putting them ahead of the Florida Gators who had given the Vols their only loss of the season.

This game established the momentum of the program for the seasons to follow. In my opinion, this game was a key step toward a national championship.


The Stop

No. 5: 1959 - LSU vs. Tennessee

Shields-Watkins Field | Dave Hooker Rank: No. 6

I agree with Dave Hooker that the win against Billy Cannon and the LSU Tigers ranks among the all-time greatest games. No one thought Tennessee really had a chance in that game, and -- on paper -- they were right. Billy Cannon was the man-beast running back of his day, and was fearsome for his ability to shred defenses. On most days, when the 1959 Tigers played they put on a clinic. The iron wall of orange-clad defenders , however, shut LSU down and did a little teaching of their own. After fumbling the ball on their own 2-yard line, and giving the Tigers an easy six points, the Vol defense found a way to save the game. Their goal-line stop as the Tigers tried for the 2-point conversion probably ranks as one of the all-time greatest defensive plays in Tennessee history (See stop-frame image, right).

Here’s former Voice of the Vols George Mooney with the call.

[audio:/LSU-1959-01-F.mp3]

(click play to hear audio)

When it was all said-and-done, the Vols came out on top in a 14-13 thriller.


No. 4: 1982 - Alabama vs. Tennessee

Neyland Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: Unranked

bama82ticket[1]This game was the final step in Johnny Majors’ rehabilitation of the Tennessee program from the doldrums of the late 1970’s. Before that win, the Vols had not beaten Alabama in 11 deplorably long years. After more than a decade, Tennessee finally managed to beat the Tide in the 35-28 Victory. The fact that it occurred during the waning days of the 1982 World’s Fair made it all the more special. This also marked then end of the Bear Bryant era, at least as far as Tennessee was concerned, as Bryant would never again coach a game in Neyland Stadium -- passing away in 1983.

majors82bama[2]

This game single-handedly returned Tennessee to its position as a year-in-year-out contender in the SEC, and re-asserted Tennessee’s tradition of winning.

Before this game, Tennessee was a second-tier team in the minds of most, that changed on "The Third Saturday in October," 1982.


sugarpgm86[1]

No. 3: 1986 Sugar Bowl - Tennessee vs. Miami

Louisiana Superdome | Dave Hooker Rank: No. 5

Ahh, the Sugar Vols. No one thought the 1985-86 Tennessee squad really had a chance against the No. 2 ranked Miami Hurricanes. The Vols, however, decided to make everyone remember them as they pounded Vinny Testaverde and the Hurricanes on both sides of the ball. While this game was played in a neutral venue -- the Superdome -- it really amounted to being played in "Neyland Stadium South" as the Big Orange faithful traveled by the thousands to cheer on their underdog Vols. This game single handedly elevated Tennessee to a "national" status as Tennessee destroyed Miami 35-7, in the Big Easy.

Here’s John Ward calling "yet another" great play by Tennessee -- namely Chris White’s 4th-quarter interception for a touchdown.

[audio:/Sugar Vols 01.mp3]

(click play to hear audio)


ND 1991

No. 2: 1991 - Tennessee vs. Notre Dame

Notre Dame Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: No. 7

There really isn’t much that needs to be said the game referred to simply as "The Miracle at South Bend." It still stands as the single most significant non-conference regular-season game the Vols ever played. While some would point to the victories over Penn State in 1971 and 1972, those were played in Neyland Stadium, which gave the Vols the huge benefit of a home crowd. In 1991, however, the Vols had to go on the road and play the No. 5 team in the country. The reality is that Tennessee was beaten in this game by the end of the first-half. The fact that the team and the coaching staff never gave up and kept fighting stands as a testament to the 1991 squad’s character. It still stands as the greatest comeback in Tennessee football history, and serves as a monument to Winston Churchill’s adage "Never, Never, Never Give Up!"

Furthermore, the final play of the game as called by John Ward stands as one of the greatest (albeit somewhat botched) calls of his storied career.

[audio:/ND-1991 01.mp3]

(click play to hear audio)
Don't you just love John Ward?


No. 1: 1998 - Florida vs. Tennessee

Neyland Stadium | Dave Hooker Rank: No. 2

Having just written about this game (reliving it in my mind along with the voices in my head) I still come to the conclusion that there has never been a more exhilarating and exciting game played at Neyland Stadium -- at least not in the modern era. This game was an absolute defensive slugfest from start to finish, and after the game was over, I was physically and mentally exhausted -- I cannot imagine what the players felt like. While I do have the 1999 Fiesta Bowl listed in my Top 10 as well (No. 9) in my opinion this game was the high-water mark for the 1998 team. This was the game that defined the team and the season. Winning the game against Florida completely changed the mindset of everyone in Orange Nation -- suddenly we all believed that a championship was possible.

Thus, even though you don’t get a trophy for winning a home game during the regular season, in my opinion, this was the Vols’ finest hour.


Well, there’s my list. Feel free to tell me I’m wrong (as I so often am)...

-- Go Figure …Email lawvol


Images Courtesy of: The VIBKnoxville News Sentinel
Audio Clips Courtesy of: The Vol Network, Host Communications, and the University of Tennessee.
**Disclaimer and Notice: All Audio Clips remain the property of the licensing authority and their respective universities and/or institutions. Gate 21 makes no claim of ownership to these clips, and they are displayed on this website for the sole purpose of entertainment and social value. Any questions or concerns regarding the display of such audio should be directed to the administrator of this site.

Flashback: The Great Games — Florida 1998

Flashback | Gate 21


The Great Games | Gate21.net

19 September 1998

Florida Football vs. Tennessee Football

(2) Florida 17(6) Tennessee 20

Neyland Stadium


Due to exceptionally bad planning on my part, I graduated from the University of Tennessee in four years -- making my trip across the stage to collect my diploma in May of 1998...

Graduation

Cartoon Courtesy of the Detroit News

I say it was bad planning because, as fate would have it -- after traveling across the country with the Pride of the Southland for four years, following the Vols to every game -- when Tennessee’s 1998 "season of destiny" rolled around, I was living more than six hours away in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. I was a student at Tarhead State (UNC) engaged in my "Trade School" studies (I call law school that mainly to annoy all the Tarhead grads who infest the area where I now live) and quite far removed from my passion for Tennessee Volunteers Football.

Thus was my lot...

For what it is worth, I blame all of this on Joel at Rocky Top Talk since, as he and I both realized a few months back, he was my "teacher" in a crib-course on how to do well on law school entrance exams, and thus Joel is totally responsible for my entry into this sordid profession and my departure from East Tennessee exactly one year too early (This all makes perfect, well-reasoned, and orderly sense in my mind, in much the same way that Alabama coach Mike DuBose ultimately concluded that "Jesus wanted us to lose to Tennessee").

Anyway, Tennessee opened the season versus the Syracuse Orangemen, and managed to hang on to victory by the absolute narrowest of margins -- namely, Jeff Hall’s foot. The Gators, on the other hand, had beaten the living hell out of some school whose name eludes me, but I am sure it has "North", "South", "Central" "Left", "Up", or "Sideways" in its name.

After the 34 to 33 victory in the Syracuse game, I was somewhat less than hopeful about the Vols chances of winning against "Lord Spurrier and his Reptile Renegades."

Nevertheless, given my incurable and uncontrollable addiction to traveling great distances, at considerable expense, to have your dreams crushed and your soul scarred, I climbed in my Volkswagen and headed back toward Knoxville for the showdown between the Florida Gators and the Vols. This was the first time I drove from Eastern North Carolina to Tennessee for a football game -- it was a new experience. Now, however, I have made this journey so many times that I have all but memorized every single exit along Interstate 40 between the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area and Knoxville, and now I can (and on occasion do) drive it while sleeping.

As you might imagine, when I arrived in the Volunteer City, I didn’t have a ticket. After searching up and down Cumberland Avenue for an hour-or-two, I finally managed to find a single ticket, in return for all of the remaining money I had to eat on for the rest of my first semester of law school (making sure not to repeat my 1992 mistake of buying student tickets).

Left to Right: My Ticket to the 1998 game • My friend's ticket to the same game • My infamous student ticket from the 1992 game when I wasn't yet a student

Despite the fact that my ticket told me that my butt was supposed to be planted in Section ZZ15 in the North Endzone Upperdeck, I chose Row 18 of Section D -- the heart of the student section -- as my vantage point for the game, since all of my friends were on the "5-year plan" (or 6, or 7, or ...) and that is where they were situated. Considering that there were somewhere between 250 and 5,000 people crammed into that row, and each of those around it, apparently I wasn’t the only one bending the rules -- or the bleachers on which we all stood, until they finally gave way and broke off of the concrete risers in the 4th-quarter.

The contest opened with the "Challenger," the bald eagle soaring his way down from the North endzone across the Pride of the Southland during the National Anthem. How exactly that beautiful bird could find where he was supposed to go amidst the screaming of nearly 108,000 fans with flashbulbs turning the stands into a bank of strobe lights, is beyond me. What a way to start a hot and steamy fistfight.

And boy was it hot and steamy that night...

This is a gross understatement, almost on par with phrases such as "Michael Jackson is a little odd," "Saddam Hussein was not a very nice man," or "O.J. Simpson seems as if he would make a less than ideal husband." I would describe the weather that night as somewhat akin to being trapped in Satan’s Crotch (Wow, I really can’t believe I just used that metaphor...) and this was a night game.

As for the game itself, there really is only one way to describe it which seems, to me, to fit ...

... "Forced Stalemate."

Neither team could ever get any separation from the other on the scoreboard -- hence "stalemate." I add "forced" because -- at least by my mind -- the two teams were not even.

On paper, the Gators had an overall advantage. When it came to Tennessee’s offense versus Florida’s defense, however, Florida -- in theory -- seemed far superior. Tennessee had a completely green and un-tested quarterback who had only one complete game under his belt, which he had barely managed to win. Florida, on the other hand, had a team peopled with demons from the seventh level of hell, coming in with a No. 2 ranking and the No. 1 ranked defense in the country, led by Jevon Kearse and Johnny Rutledge.

This game was decided on nothing more than heart...

Facing the tandem quarterback team of Jesse Palmer and Doug Johnson, the Tennessee defense came out with a vengeance, and ignoring the hype for the Gators, the Vols caused and recovered three fumbles in the first half along with 2 sacks.

While there were many huge plays in this game, in my mind, the one play which always stands out as the "one" in this contest, came in the first half, rather than near its conclusion. Early on, the Gators managed a 10-play drive down to the goal line, and seemed poised to score. The defense, however, bowed its back. As Florida's Terry Jackson rushed toward the endzone, Al Wilson made a mammoth stop of Florida’s march to six points. Instead of a Florida popping the ball into the checkerboards, Florida was stopped short, and when the whistles blew, Al Wilson and Raynoch Thompson had the ball. In my opinion this play completely defined the outcome of the game.

Even with the explosive performance by the Tennessee defense, however, Palmer and Johnson, had an impressive combined 216 passing yards in the first half.

While the defense exhibited its fire, Tennessee’s offense only managed 10 points in the first half. Still, the much touted Florida defense gave up more rushing yards in the first two plays of the game than their 50-yard average prior to kickoff, as Jamal Lewis and Shawn Bryson combined for 64 yards and Tennessee’s first touchdown of the night. Jeff Hall would add a field goal in the second quarter. Thus, Tennessee clung to a 10-3 lead which held precariously until Jesse Palmer marched the Gators down the field for a 10-play 67-yard drive leaving the score knotted at 10-10 at the half.

Stalemate...

When the teams came back on the field after halftime, Tennessee’s defense continued to pour-on the pressure. First, the defense fell on another Gator fumble. Then, Tennessee’s Deon Grant assured his place in the highlight reel with an acrobatic one-handed interception in the fourth quarter which gave the Vols the ball at midfield.

Then, with around 8-and-a-half minutes remaining in the third quarter, Tennessee found itself sitting on Florida’s 29-yard line with the ball. Tee Martin looked to Peerless Price who completely faked Dock Pollard allowing Price to gain the advantage. Price leapt for all he was worth, snatching the floater, which Martin lobbed his way, out of the air.

John WardHere’s John Ward with the call...

[audio:/Florida-PriceTD.mp3]

(click play to hear audio)

GIVE HIM SIX!!!

It was at that moment, I believe, that the Orange Nation first realized that the Vols could win this game. With that understanding, Neyland Stadium was snowed under in "white noise." Still, every time the crowd believed that the Volunteers had victory in their grasp, and the losing streak was about to snap, Florida answered back. Even with a 17-10 lead, everyone knew the game was not over.

Within two minutes, however, Florida re-asserted itself. On third-and-11 from Florida’s own 30-yard line, Jesse Palmer passed to McGriff, who never even broke his stride en route to a 70 yard touchdown as he streaked down the sideline.

Once again ... Stalemate.

Throughout the fourth quarter, the defenses shined as the offenses for both teams floundered. Neither team could manage a score, and thus, when the clock expired, the game was still tied at 17-17. The first ever overtime game held in Neyland Stadium was about to commence.

I remember watching the clock hit zero and thinking "this thing is going to spin out of control, and we’ll be lucky to escape." After nearly 3 hours of constant screaming, I took the 30 seconds before the coin toss to slag back a family-sized, watered-down, sort-o’-Coke-flavored beverage that one of the vendors was hawking. I sat there, rubbing my eyes and my head trying to figure out whether Tennessee was done for.

The Vols were tired -- that was obvious -- but so were the Gators. I knew in my head that we needed a touchdown in the first overtime if we were to possibly survive.

This just proves that my head is an empty and vacuous black hole, apparently filled with little more than string cheese...

Tennessee got the ball first. It was clear that Florida was banking on their defense -- which had held the Volunteers to 235 total yards in regulation -- to finish the deal in hopes that their offense could dig deep one last time and come up with a touchdown. In all honesty -- had I been a betting man -- I’d have given them the upper hand. The forced stalemate could only last so long.

Tee Martin did not start overtime in a very encouraging fashion -- he threw back-to-back incompletions on first and second-down. To make matters worse, a penalty backed the Vols up all the way to the 37-yard line -- not even Jeff Hall could hit a 54 yard attempt. Then, miraculously, on third-down, Tee Martin scrambled out of the pocket and ran for his life straight to the center of the field and picked up 14 precious yards.

In a replay of the preceding game, Jeff Hall came out to try and give the Vols the advantage...

The kick by Hall is in the air. The kick by Hall is ... Goo-dah!

Thus, Tennessee had a 3-point lead, but that would mean little if the Gators got into the checkerboards. The Tennessee defense truly stepped-up, and had to be playing on nothing more than fumes at that point ... that and heart. After giving up a first down, the defense played the pivotal series of the game -- answering Florida's attack with an absolutely smothering pass rush, and stymieing the Florida offense, leading up to a third-down prayer lobbed toward the endzone, that probably would have been a touchdown except for the fact that Al Wilson had an unprotected lightning blitz up the middle and connected at the exact second the ball was thrown. That incompletion meant it was time for Florida to kick its 32-yard field goal, and send the game into a second overtime.

It is very easy, as a fan in the seats, to consider field goals "automatic." After this game, I’ve never considered them automatic, and I truly came to appreciate how important the kicking game is. I am willing to bet that Steve Spurrier feels the exact same way.

The only person that can describe Florida’s Collins Cooper’s 32-yard kick is John Ward, thus, I’ll let him have the honors...

[audio:/Florida-Kick.mp3]

(click play to hear audio)

That is still my all-time favorite call by John Ward...

With that, Tennessee’s losing streak against Florida -- stretching back to the 1992 game -- was over. Bedlam broke out in Neyland Stadium, and the field was completely engulfed by fans. In less than 35-seconds, both goal posts came down -- one of which presumably still resides in the Tennessee River where it was hurled.

Above: The post-game pandemonium. Below: Al Wilson celebrating the victory.

Here’s a few video highlights courtesy of Fred Thompson and John Ward:

Of course the News Sentinel had it’s thoughts as well...

Tennessee v Florida -1998 - Headline

I can honestly say, that the 1998 Florida game is still probably the single most exhilarating night of football I’ve ever seen in Neyland Stadium, and it still stands out to me as one of the Vols' finest moments.

The celebration that night was unbelievable. Who knew that there were even bigger celebrations to come...

-- Go Figure …Email lawvol


Images Courtesy of: Smokey’s TrailThe VIBKnoxville News Sentinel
Audio Clips Courtesy of: The Vol Network, Host Communications, and the University of Tennessee.
**Disclaimer and Notice: All Audio Clips remain the property of the licensing authority and their respective universities and/or institutions. Gate 21 makes no claim of ownership as to these clips, and they are displayed on this website for the sole purpose of entertainment and social value. Any questions or concerns regarding the display of such audio should be directed to the administrator of this site.

Flashback: The Great Games — The 1996 Citrus Bowl

Flashback

The Great Games | Gate21.net

1995-96 CompUSA Citrus Bowl

(1 January 1996)

Tennessee Football vs. FB-OhioState[1]

Tennessee 20 Ohio State 14

Florida Citrus Bowl Stadium

Continuing on with 1995, after beating Bama soundly and ending the 10-year drought against the Crimson Tide, the Tennessee Volunteers finished out their regular season at 10-1. Their only loss coming at the hands of the Florida Gators in a 62-37 drubbing which tarnishes the 1995 team’s otherwise exemplary record. Tennessee finished the season ranked 4th, but in the days of the so-called Bowl Alliance, the "premier" bowls were reserved only for conference champions, thus, Tennessee received a bid to the "first outside the money" CompUSA Florida Citrus Bowl to take on the similarly situated Ohio State Buckeyes, who lost their last game of the season against arch-rival Michigan, and with it the Big 11 10 title, and ended the seasons ranked ... uhh ... 4th also.

1996 Florida Citrus Bowl

Cover from the Official 1996 Citrus Bowl Program. Ohio State later sued the bowl committee for omitting "THE" (in all caps and 72 pt font) from their name -- the matter was ultimately resolved in a settlement whereby Ohio State received a case of oranges and an autographed photo of Mickey Mouse.

The fact of the matter remains, no matter what either school would claim publicly, neither Tennessee nor Ohio State wanted to be in Orlando on New Year’s Day. Both had completed 1-loss seasons, and both came within a half of playing for the National Championship or, at a minimum, playing in one of the top-tier Alliance Bowls. Ohio State wanted to be in Pasadena and Tennessee in New Orleans or Tempe. Regardless of what they wanted, they were set to play one another in a game which -- in my book -- ranks as one of the best bowl games I’ve ever watched in person or on television.

Ohio State came in smarting from the late season wrench Michigan had thrown into their "destiny" to play in the Rose Bowl. Despite this failing, Ohio State running back Eddie George had won the Heisman Trophy only weeks before the game in Orlando -- which made them feel a whole lot better about having their entire season implode in Ann Arbor -- as it did so regularly under then coach John Cooper.

Tennessee on the other hand, found itself on the outside looking in as Florida waltzed into a date with the Nebraska Cornhuskers in the Fiesta Bowl. In retrospect, however, Tennessee is probably glad it didn’t make the trip to Tempe, since Florida took it the hard-way in a 62-24 slobberknocking by Nebraska, which led Steve Spurrier to ask in a halftime interview, "Can someone ask that scary man with no facial expressions and his corn-fed boys to stop hurting us. Please... "** Still, at the time Tennessee was highly disappointed at being left out of the big one, and all they had gotten to make them feel better was a few free passes to Disney World courtesy of the bowl committee.

By the time the teams, fans, alums, bands, and hangers-on arrived in Orlando, both had several weeks simmer and let the bowl slight fester.

One thing that became immediately apparent to me when I arrived in Orlando was that many Ohio State fans had very little respect for Tennessee. Now this is not meant as an indictment of the entirety of the Buckeye Nation, but at the time it seemed that Ohio State not only felt that they had been slighted in terms of bowls, but also in terms of opponents. In the interest of full disclosure, it is worth mentioning that my better half is an Ohio State graduate and -- when not playing Tennessee -- I pull for the Buckeyes. Still, at the time, in all of my interactions with Buckeye fans during the run-up to the New Years Day game, it seemed that Ohio State was assuming that they would simply show-up and beat Tennessee handily.

In all honesty, at the time, I thought they might be right...

Tennessee had turned the early-season disappointment of getting absolutely slaughtered in the second-half at Gainesville versus the Gators (which is right near the top of my all-time least favorite games), into something really special. Still, there was a lot of uncertainty about how the Vols speed would match up with the strength and running ability of the Buckeyes (where have I heard that one before?). While I was never one to open doubt that team, in my mind, I felt there was a distinct possibility that Tennessee could lose ... and badly.

There was so much going on that week, in preparation for the game, that I didn't have too much time to worry about it ...

If you’ve never been to a game, you really should go, at least once. They can be one hell of a lot of fun, and are wonderful experiences. I must say, despite the misgivings surrounding the 1996 Citrus Bowl, it is (and remains) one of the best run bowls anywhere. Regardless of whether Tennessee and Ohio State thought they deserved to go elsewhere, the City of Orlando really knows how to host events, and they do a bang-up job when it comes to the Citrus Bowl (now known as the CapitalOne Bowl). There are more events, parades, parties, pep-rallies, and so forth than you could possibly attend (unless you actually have to play Rocky Top till you’re blue in the face at each one, that is). In the days leading up to the game, I had a blast ...

... at least that’s what everyone tells me.

At any rate, after several beautiful sunny days in the high 70’s, New Year’s Day arrived, and the weather that day -- more or less -- reflected the physical and mental states of many who had "Given Their All for Tennessee" in the New Year’s Eve Debauchery category. It was foul. The temperature had dropped, and it rained incessantly throughout the 12 hours leading up to the game. By the time I arrived at the Citrus Bowl, along with 350 of my dear friends (the Pride of the Southland Marching Band) it had already been determined that the bands would not be permitted to perform their pre-game shows as planned, because the field -- just like those New Year’s partiers -- just wasn’t up to it.

So, there we sat -- all 70,000 football fans, clad in Orange or Red Ponchos -- in the rain, waiting for the mud to start flying...

The game started and Ohio State scored first, taking a 7-point lead over the Vols, in the first quarter, who were really unable to get things going on the offensive side of the ball. During this time, every time the Buckeyes had the ball all that could be heard was a constant chant from the Buckeyes of "Ed-die, Ed-die, Ed-die, Ed-die!!!" which, got old real fast for Tennessee fans. I also thought that the other 10 guys on offense for Ohio State -- out there busting their hump as a team -- were probably getting tired of it as well.

Then, in the second quarter, Ohio State drove down inside the 5, and looked as if they might add to their lead, putting Tennessee even farther behind. The Tennessee defense, however, held, and Ohio State was faced with 4 and goal. Rather than kick the field goal, the Buckeyes chose to try and run it in on the legs of "Ed-die" and put the game out of reach for the Vols. When the snap came, however, it was Tennessee’s Bill Duff who grabbed the spotlight -- and the momentum in the game -- as he clotheslined "Ed-die" a good yard behind the line of scrimmage and trounced him down to the grass.

At that moment, the entire complexion of the game shifted, and Tennessee began to stretch its legs...

Soon thereafter, Tennessee was on the board with as Jay Graham rumbled 69 yards to knot the score at 7. Peyton Manning added to that in the third-quarter, and Jeff Hall sealed the deal with two field goals in the fourth. Here’s John Ward (along with Fred Thompson) with the highlights:

As for "Ed-die," the Heisman trophy winner was held to a season-low 89 yards rushing, and was effectively stopped from the second quarter on. In an altogether more humorous note, after the Tennessee defense stopped him on the 2 yard line, the crowds shifted and it was the Tennessee fans who started chanting "Ed-die, Ed-die, Ed-die, Ed-die!!!" which ended up being even louder than the Ohio State fans, and far more exuberant.

To their credit, however, the Buckeyes bowed their backs and fought to the very last. In the end, however, it was Tennessee’s tenacity on defense which won the day, as they fought down to the wire to keep the Buckeyes from finding the endzone again, and potentially stealing the game away. Until the final second was off the clock, the game was never a sure thing for either team.

Final Score Tennessee 20, Ohio State 14.

ohiost95paper[1]

The win over Ohio State was one of the hardest fought victories against long odds that I ever personally witnessed the Vols record. Finishing the season 11-1, propelled the Vols to final ranking of No. 3 in the AP Poll and a No. 2 ranking in the final coaches poll -- ahead of Florida. That final ranking made the Citrus Bowl seem like quite a prize indeed, and looked far better than the beating that the Gators took in the desert of Arizona.

After all, Orange juice tastes much better than Cactus juice ...

-- Go Figure …


** The quote from Steve Spurrier is complete bullshit, but I would have given real money to hear him say that.
Images Courtesy of: UTSports.com • The VIB
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