Atarax For Sale

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Brian Butler has been called many things by many people, not all of them are nice.


Butler is a former rapper and call-center manager, and a seemingly respectable football trainer based out of Wichita, Kansas.  At present, Butler is the principal and operator of the Potential Players recruiting service through which he serves as a self-styled, come-lately, “recruiting adviser” to high school football standouts across the country.  A “gifted” self-promoter, he is also the subject of a recently announced investigation by the NCAA.

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="390" caption="Brian Butler working a recruit    (NY Times / Simmons)"][/caption]

There are many questions being asked about Butler by many people, especially those recruiting high school standout Bryce Brown (which includes Tennessee).  The fundamental question, however, centers on whether he is essentially seeking to act as a sports agent for players being recruited by college football programs.


For now, at least, there is no definitive answer to this query.


The reason that this is an issue is that Butler has widely taken the position that the only way that college recruiters can speak with high-schoolers that he is “advising” is by going through him.  To many, this appears—at least outwardly—that Butler is serving as an “agent” rather than simply as an “adviser.”


Again, why does anyone care?  Under NCAA bylaws, current and potential student athletes are prohibited from retaining agents, and requires that all prospective athletes undergo an amateurism certification process, which includes, among other things, certifying that the athlete has not agreed to be represented by an agent.  On the issue of agents, NCAA Bylaw 12.3 states that:


An individual shall be ineligible for participation in an intercollegiate sport if he or she ever has agreed (orally or in writing) to be represented by an agent for the purpose of marketing his or her athletics ability or reputation in that sport. Further, Buying Atarax online over the counter, an agency contract not specifically limited in writing to a sport or particular sports shall be deemed applicable to all sports, and the individual shall be ineligible to participate in any sport.


See NCAA Operational Bylaw 12.3.1 (PDF )



The NCAA’s website offers additional guidance stating that:

…a student-athlete (any individual who currently participates in or who may be eligible in the future to participate in intercollegiate sport) may not agree verbally or in writing to be represented by an athlete agent in the present or in the future for the purpose of marketing the student-athlete's ability or reputation. If the student-athlete enters into such an agreement, is Atarax safe, the student-athlete is ineligible for intercollegiate competition.


Also, Online buy Atarax without a prescription, a student-athlete may not accept transportation or other benefits from an athlete agent. This prohibition applies to the student-athlete and his or her relatives or friends.


The term "agent" includes actual agents, runners (individuals who befriend student-athletes and frequently distribute impermissible benefits) and financial advisors.


It is not a violation of NCAA rules if a student-athlete merely talks to an agent (as long as an agreement for agent representation is not established) or socializes with an agent.

• via: Overview of NCAA Bylaws Governing Athlete Agents | NCAA.org


Thus, low dose Atarax, Butler acting as the only means of communication with a recruit could be troubling and potentially a violation of NCAA rules, Ordering Atarax online, hence the NCAA investigation.


This raises a particularly thorny set of issues for high school athletes and their families, college athletic departments, high school coaches, Atarax pharmacy, college boosters, Atarax gel, ointment, cream, pill, spray, continuous-release, extended-release, the NCAA, and State Legislators.  That’s right, I said State Legislators.


For these reasons, Atarax description, I am personally of the opinion that someone—whether it be Butler, Buy generic Atarax, athletes, college institutions, or otherwise—will end up paying for what amounts to an infraction that lies in the proverbial “gray area” of the NCAA’s rules.  A violation in spirit, Atarax pics, if not in the letter.  The problem is, Atarax alternatives, however, that whether Butler’s conduct violates many rules or none all depends on the perspective applied to the facts, and for the record, effects of Atarax, I make no assertion that I know or understand all of the facts.


Still, Atarax treatment, let’s use a hypothetical to illustrate the complexity of the situation.


Meet Johnny Rocket


Let’s assume we have a hypothetical 17 year-old high school running back from Bugtussle, Tennessee, named Johnny Rocket.  Our boy Johnny has had a stellar career and is now looking at the possibility of playing at any number of schools across the country—all the recruiting sites have him tabbed as a 5-star recruit and the coaches across the country are salivating at the thought of having him suit up for them in the future.  Let’s also assume that no one in Johnny’s family ever played for any school and that they are simple working-class folks who really do not understand the mechanics of the recruiting process.

The Patriarch…


Using our hypothetical, Atarax trusted pharmacy reviews, let's assume that Johnny Rocket’s father ("Jackson") decides that his son is going to play for Tennessee, Atarax dosage, because that’s Jackson’s favorite team, he’s regularly gone with a friend to watch the Vols play for years, and “that’s just how it’s gonna be.”  Since Knoxville called and told Jackson that that they’d love to have Johnny wearing an orange shirt, about Atarax, Jackson has bought every single piece of orange clothing he can find and has filled Johnny’s closet.  He took Jackson to every home game in Neyland Stadium last season, No prescription Atarax online, and talked a friend’s son who is a UT student into letting Johnny spend the weekend with him so he could see what college life in Knoxville is like.  Jackson has also let it be known that no coaches anywhere from any school can do anything to talk to his son without first coming through him, but since Jackson’s mind’s made up, unless you know Lane Kiffin or Ed Orgeron you’re not getting in the door.  Case closed.


While this might seem a closed-minded and unfair way for the recruiting process to work, Atarax coupon, there is no violation of any rule of any kind whatsoever in this circumstance.  You see, Atarax duration, young Johnny—like most recruits—is a minor and his parents’ have the ability to completely control the situation.  That’s because the law recognizes their parental rights to make decisions for their minor son, regardless of whether they are reasonable or not.

The Family Adviser…


Let’s say, however, purchase Atarax online no prescription, that instead of Jackson making the decision that he turns to the assistance of a family friend whom he’s known and trusted for years: Lawius T. Buy Atarax from canada, Vawlius, Esq. (known to his friends simply as “Lawvol” and not to be confused with the author).  Jackson trusts Lawvol because he is a dear family friend, and because he is—of all things—an attorney, has known Johnny since he was a kid, and knows all about the law, about going to college, and about “life, the universe, and the bounce of the ball,”  Jackson trusts Lawvol.  Oh, and since Lawvol thinks the world of Johnny and his family, Lawvol is glad to help as a friend—for free—and not as an attorney.


Still, despite being an attorney by profession, there is no prohibition on family friends and advisers helping out in the recruiting process.  It matters little whether that friend is an attorney, a coach (who probably played or went to a coaching camp somewhere), a priest (although I suppose the Notre Dame or Boston College pull might be a bit sketchy), or a former college player.  A friend giving free advice is just that—usually.


Here’s the catch.  Our hypothetical friend Lawvol is a donor to Tennessee’s VASF and has been a season ticket holder for years now.  Thus, Lawvol is a “booster” in the eyes of the NCAA.  As a result, there are limits on what Lawvol can say about Tennessee and how much he can encourage Johnny to play for the Big Orange.


Were Lawvol, in accompanying Johnny to all the programs across the country, to decide that his best choice would be to go to THE Ohio State University, with whom Lawvol has no affiliation, then Lawvol can engage in all the arm-twisting, lawerly-double-talk, and encouraging he wants—he’s not a booster and no amount of the “Come to Jesus” talk is too much.  Lawvol, as a family outsider, can talk with recruiters at Ohio State till he’s blue-in-the-face, can make endless trips with Johnny to Columbus, he can even help Johnny pick out a sweatshirt or two on Short North near campus after visiting the Horseshoe.  Lawvol could even tell coaches—as the appointed family friend and adviser—that they cannot talk to Johnny unless he approves it.


When it comes to talking-up Lawvol’s beloved Tennessee Volunteers, however, things would be much different and could result in something fairly similar to the Albert Means scenario if he went too far.  Other than that, however, everything here is perfectly within the rules.

Someone Call the Butler…


Once again, let’s say that Jackson wants help and he calls Brian Butler.  Now the dynamic changes—or does it?


Butler has made it clear that he’s willing to do much of what our preceding two advisers did, but on some points he is less willing.  First, no purchases of clothing or free trips.  Second, no prohibitions on any specific schools, just a general requirement that he be the contact for communicating with Johnny.  These are important because they could be no-no’s.


Here is what Butler offers to do for our Johnny, and any other player out there who needs a little advice on the recruiting process:

Our Goal

To assist student-athletes in making positive decisions by recognizing the impact their lives have in our world; while preparing them physically and spiritually to overcome the challenges of life.

What Potential Players Provides


  • Academic College Tours

  • Career Development Seminars

  • Golf and BBQ Charity Event

  • Host Nike Sparq Camps and Combines

  • Speed, Agility and Football Skill Training

  • Academic and Athletic Assessment

  • Academic Enhancement

  • ACT, SAT Preparation

  • Player Highlight Films

  • Player Recruiting Assistance

  • Attending Fall College Games

  • Weekly Film Study

  • Attending Winter and Summer Combines and Camps

  • Host Seminars and Coaching Clinics


• via: Potential Players.com | About Us



Oh, but there is the small fact that Brian Butler—unlike Jackson and Lawvol—is getting paid for his help.  He gets paid a nominal fee by Johnny’s parents and gets paid infinitely more by those sponsoring his events, courting him to gain his favor, and others “interested” in college recruiting.

Thoughts from the Bully Pulpit


In the end, you can see where the lines between one type of adviser and another are blurry and whether they are different in form as opposed to substance is really a matter of perspective.  In reality, the most troubling one would likely be my fictitious “Lawvol” dealing with a recruit who wanted to attend Tennessee.  So is what Brian Butler is doing troubling?


For me, it is.


The reason I have problems with what Butler is doing is because, at the end of the day, it is all about making money for Butler off of the talent of high school kids and their families.  Sure, he is providing advice to those who probably need it and don’t have anywhere to obtain it.  Good for him.  The difference between him and everyone else is that he is operating as if he were a sports agent and is banking the benefits.  Is he making anything approaching what some of the major sports agents make?  Probably not.  Still, I’m sure he’s making a comfortable living off of the endeavor.


Yes, I realize that college athletic programs also make money off of the student-athletes they field, but that is a little different in my mind.  The benefits that a school gets from its players are substantial, but so are the benefits provided to the student athlete—namely an education and a chance to compete.  Furthermore, most college athletics programs are in a constant state of hemorrhaging cash, only a select few (Tennessee being one of the few) actually make any money at the end of the season.  They are simply a creature of tradition which are designed to self-perpetuate as best they can.  Most athletic departments are constantly chasing dollars because they pour out as fast as they come in.  The few programs that manage to achieve solvency in a traditional business sense—like Tennessee—typically disgorge their profit back to their parent institution.  Thus, though it is a money game, it’s not the typical profit and loss system that is seen in other areas of sport.  I am, however, biased in favor of college athletics.


So what, if anything, can or should be done about it?


One of the questions that Hooper raised in his article was what exactly can the NCAA do to police Butler if they want to impose their will upon him?  The simple answer is, by itself, not much.  Butler is not a player and is not a sanctioned institution.  Thus, he can’t be given a penalty for an infraction.


Could a player be sanctioned or declared ineligible for using Butler, Atarax For Sale. Potentially, buy cheap Atarax no rx, but I doubt that the NCAA would be quite that draconian on a high school kid who simply wants to do the best for himself and unwittingly trusted Butler.


Could the NCAA sanction schools for using Butler. Order Atarax online c.o.d, That seems doubtful considering that the programs are not the ones controlling the contacts and recruiting process—they are essentially beholden to Butler and simply along for the ride on the rollercoaster that Butler has created.  The one exception that might lead to a school getting sanctioned would be if a program provided any sort of financial incentive to Butler (a/k/a “bribes”) in return for a recruit’s ear or commitment.  That would most certainly lead to sanctions, but really is not any different than the aforementioned Albert Means scenario.


It is entirely possible that the NCAA has additional weapons in its legal arsenal of which I am simply not aware, in fact it is likely.  I am not an expert in the area of NCAA compliance, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, rules, Generic Atarax, and regulations.  At first blush, however, Butler does appear to be operating outside the existing regulatory framework—at least in a traditional sense.


So, Atarax maximum dosage, if the NCAA has no control over Butler, Order Atarax online overnight delivery no prescription, is that it. No.


The fact of the matter is that the NCAA does not have to exercise its authority to reign Butler in—that’s where those State Legislators I mentioned earlier, and a little thing called the Uniform Athlete Agents Act (UAAA) come into play.


In the fall of 2000, where can i order Atarax without prescription, the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (NCCUSL)—a blue-ribbon panel of lawyers, Atarax steet value, judges, state legislators and law professors appointed at the state level—released the Uniform Athlete Agents Act which was intended to “provide a uniform system for regulating athlete agents.”  This Model Act was drafted by a taskforce at the NCAA’s request.  Upon release, it was submitted to all of the state legislatures across the country.  In some form or fashion, Atarax online cod, 43 states and territories have enacted the provisions of the UAAA, Atarax samples, are in the process of enacting it, or have a similar act already in place.  Tennessee is one of the states which enacted the UAAA verbatim  (See TCA § 49-7-2122 — § 49-7-2141 ).


The UAAA imposes strict requirements on Agents in terms of how, when, Atarax over the counter, and where they do business.  It also requires that they register with state officials as athlete agents.  Violations of the provisions of the UAAA can lead to civil and criminal liabilities.  In the case of civil suits, Order Atarax from United States pharmacy, any award is trebled (multiplied by a factor of three), state officials can impose administrative fines up to $25,000 per violation of the Act, online buying Atarax hcl, and criminal penalties—which in Tennessee are a class E felony—can result in up to six years in prison.  (See id. )


Whether Butler’s actions fall within the reach of the UAAA is a question which would be open to debate.  That said, Comprar en línea Atarax, comprar Atarax baratos, if the NCAA were concerned enough, there is no reason that the UAAA could not be revised to include activities of precisely the sort in which Butler is engaged.  Thus, while it might not be possible for the NCAA to stop Butler at present, where can i buy cheapest Atarax online, there is no reason that they could not potentially stop him at some point down the road though the use of the NCAA’s considerable power in the various legislatures of states far and wide.

But is all of that really worth it?

Whether or not Brian Butler is deserving of some sort of censure is open for debate.  Undoubtedly, Atarax dose, the NCAA will let the world know its thoughts when its investigation is concluded.  Until then, it is all speculation.

If the NCAA determines that Butler is in violation of its rules, buy Atarax no prescription, then likely as not, Order Atarax no prescription, there will be a furor to follow.  What impact that might have on Bryce Brown’s recruitment is beyond me.  Still, until then all eyes in the recruiting world will be focused squarely on the exploits of Brian Butler and the considerable weight of the NCAA investigatory lens bearing down upon him.


Butler asserts that his service is legitimate and that he is simply helping players maximize that potential.  Helping someone maximize their potential is hardly a moral  offense.  Violating the rules of the NCAA, while hardly laudable, Atarax schedule, is sometimes understandable given their massive breadth and scope (PDF ).  Sometimes, rules get broken with the best of intentions out of no true fault on the part of the offender.  In my opinion that is not what is going on in the case of Brian Butler.


Though perhaps un-sanctionable for now, however, the use of high school athletes—their families, their hopes, their dreams, their desire to excel—to propel yourself to national prominence and wealth, in my opinion, is hardly reputable and should not be condoned.  While Butler may not have violated any rules or regulations which can be enforced, his shameless self-promotion paired with his willingness to interject himself into the recruitment of athletes in unprecented ways, makes me seriously question his motives.  I cannot say that Butler is dirty—I am not privy to those facts.  It does, however, appear to this author that he is.


Whether the NCAA agrees remains to be seen…


-- So it goes…About Lawvol



Portions of this post relied upon information published by: The New York TimesRocky Top TalkDr. SaturdayThe Quad BlogImage(s) Courtesy of: The New York Times / Brandi Simmons
.

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15 Responses to “Atarax For Sale”

  • OskieNo Gravatar says:

    Nicely done, Lawvol. I threw a link up on our site, and thanks for taking the time to do this.

  • hooperNo Gravatar says:

    Many thanks, lawvol.

    It’s going to be a long, ugly road. I’m still of the mind that he’s either not violating any rules or he’s only marginally in violation. It seems that he’s set up pretty well to offer a defense against most charges; even the fee paid by families isn’t necessarily unreasonable or a violation if handled properly. I think that’ll depend largely on whether he can correctly be classified as an agent.

    However, it seems that nearly everybody agrees that he’s more hindrance in the system than help. I’m leery and I hope that the NCAA finds a way to keep this in check (without resorting the Congress…)

  • Ghost of NeylandNo Gravatar says:

    This is a very, very good breakdown. The Butler stuff is very troubling and I’d like to think that Bryce Brown wouldn’t be punished, but it concerns me. It’s an agent. It just is. I’ve always thought so. I hope I’m wrong.

  • lawvolNo Gravatar says:

    I really have problems with what Butler is doing. He may have the truest of intentions, but then again so did Jim Bakker in the beginning.

    I just think this sort of thing leads the world of college recruiting — which is already suspect, at best — down a path that it need go.

    Of course, I’ve been wrong before…

  • hooperNo Gravatar says:

    I fully agree.

    Even if Butler is 100% pure and philanthropic, it’s a trend that, in the larger sense, will lead to trouble. If not Butler, then some other outfit down the road will take this the wrong way.

    And even if a handler goes truly rogue and takes boatloads of cash from boosters to funnel recruits a certain direction, there’s really nothing the NCAA can do. They can’t fine the guy; they can only blackball any recruits that sign on with him and sanction the school itself. The handler will walk away with a bank of cash and a lot of time to enjoy Monaco.

  • It’s obvious Johnny Rocket isn’t as good as he’s hyped. If he was Saban would have offered him.

  • lawvolNo Gravatar says:

    @ Crimson Daddy: Heh! I never said Saban wasn’t after him. I suppose Saban was just a little to slow to get in the door. Seriously, thanks for stopping by and for the comment.

    @ Hooper: You know though, I am not convinced that Butler couldn’t fall within the scope of the UAAA as it exists in the various states. I am not sure of that (I didn’t take the time to read the legislative notes or any cases construing it), but it is quite possible. That, however, would be for lawyers far more skilled in the area of NCAA compliance than I to determine.

  • hooperNo Gravatar says:

    I wonder if that’s why he registered his nonprofit in Illinois rather than Kansas.

  • hooperNo Gravatar says:

    Bingo!

    Link

    This, I think, is important. Kansas signed the UAAA and Illinois has no such law. That’s why the nonprofit is registered in Podunksville, Ill.

  • voljunkieNo Gravatar says:

    Lawvol, Great post, I learned alot I didnt know, my first thought is this guy is a agent, if he is getting paid he is a agent bottom line. Another thing that concerns me is like Hooper pointed out this behavior is going to lead to nothing but bad things in the future, other outfits can start building recruit camps like the four horsemen and the new world order. If he in anyway has any influence over where these kids sign and he has taken money from their family it has to be a violation. And who is going to regulate boosters from xyz U going straight to Butler and offering him big money to sway a kids decision? Or boosters offering to sponsor him or his activities for a little help in the swaying department. This whole thing is very troubling. If you just look at his website, you can tell he is making money off of it, who knows how much he has profited from the timeframe between signing day and today just from the fact that Bryce hasnt signed which translates to traffic to his site. In my opinon if you sponsor/help more then one or two kids, you no longer represent the best intrest of the kid you now are a business with a agenda. Sorry I dont have any big words to contribute, I am just a junkie LOL

  • voljunkieNo Gravatar says:

    I also wonder about the banner on his website, in the photo gallery which is a picture of Stoops and Carroll. Does that mean he is affliated with him, or his outfit considers them the best, I know its just a picture but why them?

  • HudroNo Gravatar says:

    Interesting post. I wonder if Brown were to sign and play and then later it is discovered he has lost his amateur status, does the school forfeit the victories? I am really concerned that this will blow up in the face of whoever gets him. I think Miami may have been wise to back off. Maybe we should too and leave this kid alone. Big time DL and CB don’t come along every year but there are always great backs coming out with every class.

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